Historic Seton Hall

Since its founding in 1856, Seton Hall University has been a major Catholic university in the North East. The buildings on campus demonstrate how the institution has grown over time, from a small rural college to a larger campus encompassing three locations in the New York metropolitan area. The school was founded to assist Catholic immigrants to assimilate into American culture. Over time, evidence of the school’s ideological shift from an emphasis on life preparedness over to the large-scale implementation of technologies can be seen in the campus’ expansion and modernization. Now supporting over 75 majors, Seton Hall strives to equip students with a strong education that will lay the groundwork for success.

Mooney Hall

This structure was built in the Collegiate Gothic Revival tradition in 1910 and served as the longtime home of Seton Hall Preparatory School. The pointed arch windows and entry are earmarks of this style, which was also used during this time at…

Marshall Hall

Constructed in 1898, Marshall Hall was the first dedicated library on campus, housing approximately 18,000 volumes. This building as well as Presidents and Stafford Halls were the original three buildings on campus when the college moved from Madison…

Stafford Hall

The foundation of what is now Stafford Hall was constructed during the 1860s. It was known as “The College Building” or “The Main Building” for a number of years, housing administrative offices, classrooms, and dormitory rooms. During this…

President's Hall

Presidents Hall, known as the Main Building after 1927, was completed in 1867 and served as the original home of the Immaculate Conception Seminary. In 1866, President Bayley commissioned a large stained-glass depiction of Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton…

Chapel of the Immaculate Conception

This chapel, completed in 1863 and dedicated in 1870, was designed by architect Jeremiah O’Rourke and is one of the oldest buildings on campus. The chapel is the spiritual center of the campus celebrating daily mass and hosting numerous Baptisms…

Bayley Hall

Bayley Hall was built in 1913 and named for Bishop James Roosevelt Bayley, first Bishop of Newark. This building formerly housed the Seton Hall Grammar School until 1926. Bishop James Roosevelt Bayley founded Seton Hall College in 1856 in honor of…

McLaughlin Library

Opened in 1955, McLaughlin Library was the second library building on campus and was an example of Mid-Century Modernist architecture. The building’s appearance, with its symmetry and clean lines made McLaughlin Library stand out in contrast to the…

McNulty Hall

McNulty Hall was built in 1954 to host classrooms for new majors in the fields of biology, chemistry, and physics. Named after Monsignor John L. McNulty, president of the university from 1949-1959, the building contains a popular artwork known as the…

McQuaid Hall

Built in the early 1900’s, McQuaid Hall was built in the Colonial Revival Style. The original use for the building was an infirmary, staffed by dedicated members of the Sisters of Charity from nearby Convent Station. The Sisters of Charity were…

Owen Carroll/Mike Sheppard Field

Around 1905, a permanent baseball diamond was christened where present-day Owen Carroll/Mike T. Sheppard Field is today. From that time forward, the fields have been home to Seton Hall’s sports teams. You can see the photograph of one of the…

Alumni Hall

Built in 1881, Alumni Hall served as the first campus center for Alumni Affairs. By 1884, the hall hosted billiard rooms and gymnastics equipment. After the Main College Building was destroyed by a fire in 1886, all essential operations were shifted…

Seton Hall Gym and Auditorium

Walsh Gymnasium, constructed in the Brutalist style, opened in 1940. The design and concrete construction rely on form following function. Seating up to 2,600 people, this building was named for Archbishop Thomas J. Walsh. During most of the mid-20th…

Farinella Gate

The original entrance to Seton Hall was the McNulty Memorial Gateway, which you can see in the color rendering. In 1988, the Farinella Gate, located at the intersection of South Orange Avenue and Centre Street was opened to keep up with the flow of…
Major contributions to this project were made by the following individuals (listed in alphabetical order): Peter Ahr, Ph.D., Alan Delozier, D.Litt., Brian Meadows, Ph.D., and Sarah Ponichtera, Ph.D.